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Discovered "officially" in 1770 on St. Paul Island in Labrador, Canada, labradorite had, in fact, been found among the artifacts of Native Americans in the north-eastern United States. After its "discovery," labradorite became a popular gemstone in 18th century Europe. Known as "Black Moonstone" or "Falcons Eye," labradorite looks dull grey until light reflects off its many embedded fine crystalline layers and creates a vivid mix of peacock blues, violets, yellows, oranges, and greens.

Like many stones that can create rainbow effects with light, labradorite can inspire many levels of energy and awareness. Healers attribute one of its most important properties as the ability to protect ones auric energy from being drained by other people. It is also effective in alleviating bone problems and joint ailments. Psychologically, labradorite has a calming effect and is good for people with irascible personalities. In addition, it is attributed with increasing intuition and creativity.

Astrologically, labradorite is associated with Sagittarius, Scorpio, Aquarius, and Leo.

Labradorite
Labradorite
Labradorite
Labradorite